Why sudden cardiac arrests no longer peak in the morning
 

Ana Sandoiu

New research, published in the journal Heart Rhythm, discovers that due to recent cultural shifts in our work schedules and daily stressors, sudden cardiac arrests no longer tend to occur in the mornings.
person holding their chest.

Until now, the consensus has been that a range of cardiovascular events, such as angina, heart attacks, and stroke, tend to happen mostly in the early hours of the morning.

A possible explanation for this phenomenon is that in the morning, the sudden pressures of daily activities put a strain on people’s cardiovascular system.

Just waking up, in fact, releases the activity of certain hormones, such as cortisol, that raise blood pressure, heart rate, and glucose levels, as well as narrow blood vessels and prompt our hearts to pump harder.

However, given the new pressures of modern life — such as instant communication, the prevalence of smartphones, apps, and the online medium in general — the timing of our daily stressors may have changed.

So, do these changes have a bearing on certain cardiovascular events and the time of day in which they occur? New research suggests so.

Categories Health


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